Loading...
Yet Another Shot is a video produced in Lebanon in 2005 in Beirut, the day Lebanese parliamentarian and journalist Jubran Tweiny was assassinated. It was shot with the intention of producing imagery that depicts the act of describing an event and receiving it, by deliberately ignoring it.

Shot at the site of explosion that took the life of the politician, the video shows images of TV reporters covering the breaking news. It all started from the normality of the explosion site being near where I was, and so I borrowed a MiniDV camera and rushed to it, filming what I found; a recurrent scene at the periphery of this fresh death.

Tweiny is not the first politician to be murdered. We already have the template for covering the event. The text is almost predictable. The event is already familiar. A security personnel picks a fight with the reporter over showing the image of the bombed car on camera. A van driver says he was happy because the assassination meant there was no traffic on the roads. He says he wished they’d murder one for him everyday. Yet Another Shot delves into the regularization of acts of violence in Lebanon, a process spearheaded by the media and diffused to society at large.

In spearheading this regularization, the event itself is lost. In reality, It is left uncovered. In the very motions of going to the explosion site and conducting reporting from there, we are left with some void, that emerges from the normality of the portrayal of the event. What if we were a little more implicated? A little more afflicted? A little maladjusted?

 

Yet Another Shot is a video produced in Lebanon in 2005 in Beirut, the day Lebanese parliamentarian and journalist Jubran Tweiny was assassinated. It was shot with the intention of producing imagery that depicts the act of describing an event and receiving it, by deliberately ignoring it.

Shot at the site of explosion that took the life of the politician, the video shows images of TV reporters covering the breaking news. It all started from the normality of the explosion site being near where I was, and so I borrowed a MiniDV camera and rushed to it, filming what I found; a recurrent scene at the periphery of this fresh death.

Tweiny is not the first politician to be murdered. We already have the template for covering the event. The text is almost predictable. The event is already familiar. A security personnel picks a fight with the reporter over showing the image of the bombed car on camera. A van driver says he was happy because the assassination meant there was no traffic on the roads. He says he wished they’d murder one for him everyday. Yet Another Shot delves into the regularization of acts of violence in Lebanon, a process spearheaded by the media and diffused to society at large.

In spearheading this regularization, the event itself is lost. In reality, It is left uncovered. In the very motions of going to the explosion site and conducting reporting from there, we are left with some void, that emerges from the normality of the portrayal of the event. What if we were a little more implicated? A little more afflicted? A little maladjusted?